Quinoa & Sesame Bread

Quinoa & Sesame Bread

gluten-free, dairy-free, corn-free

Inspired by the recipe for “Quinoa Sesame ‘Wonder’ Bread” (in Gluten-Free Makeovers by Beth Hillson, 2011, DaCapo/LifeLong/Perseus Book Group, Cambridge, MA) I bought some quinoa flour and sesame seeds this week. I had no interest in the “Wonder Bread texture” mentioned in the recipe, so rather than using equal parts quinoa/cornstarch/tapioca starch, I added fiber with sorghum and millet flours, and cut back on the starches. (I believe this will also be the first loaf I have made containing NO arrowroot starch, the typical replacement for cornstarch.)

I also noticed that the ingredients and method (of Hillman’s recipe) were very similar to the High Fiber Bread I made a few days ago, so I decided to play a bit with my hand-mixing technique (still no stand mixer). (1) I mixed the yeast in with the other dry ingredients and added slightly warmer water (rather than proofing first) and (2) I borrowed a method from Rose Levy Beranbaum’s The Bread Bible: mixing the dough without salt and letting it rest a bit before adding the salt and additional water. (Salt is known to interfere with the yeast action, so giving the yeast a chance to start working before adding the salt helps with the rising.) I really liked the texture of the dough going into the pan. Finally, to try to avoid the “holey sunken middle” problem, I worked more at smoothing the dough in the pan to remove any possible air pockets.

Ingredients

  • 1 to 2 Tbls sesame seeds
  • 1-1/4 cups quinoa flour
  • 1/2 cup sorghum flour
  • 1/2 cup millet flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca starch
  • 1/2 cup potato starch
  • 3 Tbls brown sugar
  • 3-1/2 tsp guar gum
  • 2-1/2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 3 Tbls oil
  • 1-1/8 cup water, warmed to 120°F
  • 1-1/2 tsp salt

Directions

  • Make sure all your ingredients are at room temperature. [I usually measure out my flours into a large bowl, take the eggs and any other refrigerated ingredients out of the frig, and let them sit on the counter while I do something else for 30-60 minutes.]
  • Grease one 8-1/2″ x 4-1/2″ loaf pan.
  • Heat a dry skillet over medium-high heat. Add the sesame seeds and stir continuously until they begin to brown. Remove from the heat and cool.
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine quinoa, sorghum, and millet flours, tapioca starch, potato starch, brown sugar, guar gum, and yeast. Stir/whisk together until everything is evenly combined.
  • Heat the water to 120°F (if you haven’t done that already—see NOTE).
  • In a separate medium bowl, beat together the eggs and the oil.
  • Add approximately 1/2 cup of the water to the dry ingredients. Stir well. Add the egg/oil mixture. Stir well.
  • Sprinkle the sesame seeds over the dough. [I reserved about 1 tsp of sesame seeds for the top of the bread, but the original recipe didn’t do this; we’ll see if they burn in the oven.] Stir everything together. At this point you should have a very rough dry-ish dough that almost holds together. If much loose flour remains in the bowl, add a bit more water and stir. Cover the bowl of dough and let it rest for 5-10 minutes. [This will allow the gum to absorb water and the yeast to start working.]
  • Sprinkle the salt and 1/2 the remaining water over the dough. Stir together. Decide if you need the rest of the water. Add and stir if necessary.
  • Spread the dough into the prepared pan. Use a silicon or oiled spatula to press the dough down and spread evenly in the pan. Spritz the top with a bit of oil and sprinkle any reserved sesame seeds on the top. Cover with oiled plastic wrap and allow to rise in a warm place for 40-60 minutes or until the dough comes almost to the top of the pan.
  • Preheat the oven to 350°F. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until the interior temperature of the bread is 200°F. Turn onto a wire rack and cool completely before slicing.

Note

  • There are a number of common methods for heating the water to the correct temperature (110°F if proofing the yeast separately; 120°F if mixing the yeast in with your other dry ingredients). If your hot water comes out of the tap at 120°F, you can use that; some folks prefer to use filtered water and heat it in the microwave (60 seconds is usually enough to get from room temp to 120°F ; if the water is over 130°F, let it cool before using) [I’m in this camp]; still other folks boil water on the stove and then add cold water to get to the correct temperature. Whichever method you choose, PLEASE use an instant-read thermometer to tell you the temperature. I don’t care if you raised 6 babies and know how to test liquids on your wrist, that may be good enough for babies, but it is NOT good enough for baking bread!!

Pictures

OMG!  This may be my best-looking GF loaf EVER!!

[Later:  I can now confirm that the loaf did NOT sink in the middle and does not have big holes in the center!  Yippee!!—Still need to taste it, but have had 4 slices of bread today, so probably not until tomorrow.]

[Update 3/19/12: I can now verify that this bread makes a yummy sandwich!!  I toasted two slices and made a tuna salad/lettuce/mayo sandwich.  Very tasty!  Except for the top crust (with all the sesame seeds) the bread is neutral in a good way—no overwhelming taste of a particular flour, just a nice hearty loaf.  Definitely NOT the “Wonder Bread” of the original recipe . . . more like a “soft, light, wheat, sandwich bread,” but without the wheat 🙂  Yeah! we’ve got a winner with this recipe! ]

© 2012 Highly Sensitive Girl

 

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3 thoughts on “Quinoa & Sesame Bread

    • Thanks!
      I use an online converter app . . . but don’t know how accurate/reliable it is. I hope to someday get to the point in my allergy-free baking that I’m using weights instead of cups (this is what I used to do when I made Wheat Breads). Unfortunately, GF flours seem to make this more complicated; each of the flours listed in the recipe will convert slightly differently.
      A quick online search pulled up a conversion chart that lists cup-to-gram conversions for many GF flours here: http://realfoodmadeeasy.ca/gluten-free-baking/gluten-free-flour-weight-volume-measures/ (it’s a pdf file you would need to download). Do let me know if you find a reliable source for conversion.
      HSG

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